The Radiograph
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6 months ago

Spy Stations

Transcript
Speaker A:

Incoming transmission from the radiograph.

Speaker B:

Welcome back to the radiograph, your renegade station at the edge of reality. Today we're broadcasting from a secret location in the Halogen district, home of the 12th annual plastic Pumpkin Fest. Welcome the fall shadows with a haunted night market, the new interactive hologram garden, and, of course, karaoke to the death. Tickets are on sale now. Shortwave number stations have been used for decades to send secrets through the air and around the world. There's the iron triangle, which transmits coded strings of letters and numbers, all read by the same soft, dreamy voice. Or there's vx 104, which plays a pattern of metallic beeps and crackles every hour. Some stations were used for espionage in the Cold War. Others were used to spread false information during the West La Brea revolution. But for the most part, very little is known about the origins, operations, or purposes of these shortwave mysteries. This is purple urchins with spy stations.

Speaker C:

8780.

Speaker A:

You may be a collaborator, willingly or unwillingly, with or without your knowledge.

Speaker C:

Perhaps you haven't thought about it that way. 018-78-4252 shadow. Four. Shadow. Seven. Purple. Revolver, purple.

Speaker D:

X rays, ultraviolet, visible and infrared rays and radio waves. Much radio noise, however, remains a mystery.

Speaker A:

Television, nine.

Speaker C:

Television.

Speaker A:

Nine.

Speaker C:

Mercury. Mercury. 471002. Cigarette. Zero. Zero. Two.

Speaker D:

X rays, ultraviolet, visible and infrared rays and radio waves. Much radio noise, however, remains a mystery.

Speaker E:

Firefly.

Speaker A:

You put some gas in the car.

Speaker E:

Firefly.

Speaker A:

Or perhaps you make coffee.

Speaker E:

Firefly.

Speaker A:

You are the one selling the newspaper at the corner.

Speaker E:

Exorcism.

Speaker C:

Eight, eight.

Speaker A:

Someone else loads a revolver.

Speaker C:

Eight, eight.

Speaker A:

You may be a collaborator. Willingly or unwillingly, with or without your knowledge.

Speaker C:

Perhaps you haven't thought about it that way. Refrigerator.

Speaker A:

One, one, nine.

Speaker C:

Refrigerator.

Speaker A:

One, one, nine.

Speaker C:

Asteroid, two, six. Asteroid two, one, six. Tumble.

Speaker F:

Seven.

Speaker C:

70. Tunnel.

Speaker F:

Seven.

Speaker C:

Tunnel, zero. Tumble.

Speaker F:

Seven.

Speaker C:

Tunnel zero. 018-780-1878.

Speaker B:

Thank you for tuning in to our latest transmission. Until next time, this is the radiograph, and we'll see you between the sound waves.

Speaker A:

Radiograph. Turn on your x ray radio.

For the most part, very little is known about these short wave mysteries.